Contents Blogs Introduction Fisher One Page One Page Explanation Contacts Links


FISHER SHOTOKAN KARATE

THE FISHER SHOTOKAN ONE PAGE

By Sensei Malcolm Fisher

Copyright Malcolm Fisher. All rights reserved.

Fisher Shotokan karate is characterized by a root definition, two main principles and six cardinal rules of movement.

 

THE ROOT DEFINITION OF KARATE-DOH IS:
Learning to use one's body efficiently, with control, to develop the maximum amount of energy and apply it at a time and a place, for a specific purpose.

 

DISTANCE PRINCIPLE:    FOOT POSITION PRINCIPLE:
Why? Because distance to an objective determines what you should do.      Why? Because your foot position determines what you can do.

 

THE 6 CARDINAL RULES OF MOVEMENT:
1. The first half, the loading half, of any technique must be explosive. Why? So that an opponent cannot respond to you offensively, catching you on the way in or, defensively, escaping your technique.
 
2. The first direction your body moves is straight down. Why? It is like loading a spring, the greater the compression, the greater the stored energy.
 
3. At the mid point fully loaded position (MPFLP) the big toe of the loaded leg is pointed directly at the target. Why? It is only in this position that the loaded leg becomes fully loaded.
 
4. At the mid point fully loaded position (MPFLP) the Center of Mass (CM) is directly over the toes of the loaded leg. Why? In this position the angle of the shin bone ensures that, when the loaded leg begins to unload, the stored energy will immediately translate into horizontal motion.
 
5. From the beginning of the release of the stored energy in the loaded leg, to the critical instant of energy delivery, the heel of the loaded leg must be in contact with the ground. Why? Otherwise the loaded leg cannot be fully loaded and the time taken to unload will increase.
 
6. During any linear attack the upper and lower halves of the attacker's body must unload simultaneously. Why? Otherwise kinetic energy development cannot be maximized.

Copyright Malcolm Fisher. All rights reserved.

 

This web page last updated March 8, 2015.

Contents Blogs Introduction Fisher One Page One Page Explanation Contacts Links